EV charging

Statewide LG EE Best Practices: Weekly Update



Webinar tomorrow!

Tried, True and New Strategies to Fund and Implement Energy Retrofit Projects for Schools

Wondering how to continue funding your district’s energy efficiency projects in the “Post-Prop 39” era? Curious to learn how others are leveraging external resources to keep their project pipelines (and budgets) on track?

Join the Southern California Regional Energy Network (SoCalREN) for a one hour webinar on August 7th at 10:30 AM to explore funding and resources for K-12 schools pursuing energy efficiency!



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Resources & Opportunities

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Job Announcements



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Copyright © 2018 Statewide Local Government Energy Efficiency Best Practices Coordinator, All rights reserved.
The wEEkly update for Local Governments and their partners.

Our mailing address is:
Local Government Energy Efficiency Best Practices Coordinator
980 9th St., Suite 1700
Sacramento, CA 95814

Statewide LG EE Best Practices: Weekly Update


The wEEkly Update

For Local Governments and their partners

October 16, 2017

The Coordinator would like to highlight upcoming SEEC Webinars, the new Learning Portal for GHG emission inventories, and PG&E's production building ZNE demonstration:

SEEC Learning Portal
The SEEC Learning Management System Portal is your hub for energy efficiency, climate, and emissions-management resources as well as a guided-learning platform for managing GHG emissions.

Clean Transportation Vehicle Technologies - Oct. 24
Speakers will provide an overview of transportation electrification, natural gas vehicles, hydrogen fuel cells, and the role of municipalities to reduce GHG emissions in the transportation sector.

Practical Guidance for Local Climate Engagement - Oct. 31 & Nov. 21
In this two-part webinar series, participants will be equipped to communicate effectively on climate change, empowering you to create and deliver compelling messages that engage and motivate a diversity of Americans in the issue.

Cost Effective Zero Net Energy Practices for Production Home Builders - Nov. 1
Join the experts involved in the PG&E ZNE Production Builder Demonstration as they detail the design features that resulted in superior thermal performance, reduced material cost and waste, as well as energy and water savings for occupants.

Building Operator Certification – Nov. 9
Learn how the training program benefits building personnel, facility departments, building owners, the environment, and bottom lines.
 


News














Resources and Opportunities 



Upcoming events
Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) Program Fall Symposium – Oct. 18
Webinar: Energy Efficiency Regulations for Computers - Oct. 18
Workshop on the Draft 2017 Integrated Energy Policy Report - Oct. 23
BayREN Forum on the Rise of Renewables and Its Impact on the Grid - Oct. 24
Webinar: Clean Transportation Vehicle Technologies - Oct. 24
CDP Cities North America Workshop – Oct. 25
Practical Guidance for Local Climate Engagement - Oct. 31 & Nov. 21
Webinar: Financing and Incentives to Foster Zero Net Energy - Oct 31

Cost Effective Zero Net Energy Practices for Production Home Builders - Nov. 1
Webinar: BayREN - PACE and Financing - Nov. 7
Webinar: Building Operator Certification – Nov. 9

Find more events





Copyright © 2017 Statewide Local Government Energy Efficiency Best Practices Coordinator, All rights reserved.
The wEEkly update for Local Governments and their partners.

LG EE Best Practices: Weekly Update

wEEkly update

05/12/2017


Funding Wizard | Energy Standards Online Resource Center | Energy Code Ace
CAISO Today's Outlook



News and Opportunities

New Date for CPUC ZNE Action Plan Workshops
The workshops will be held on June 5th. In-person attendance is recommended.

ICLEI to Launch Online Training Platform for ClearPath in July
The new training platform, or Learning Managment System, will provide an attractive, intuitive structure for local governments to learn the ClearPath online.

Fremont to require solar panels, EV chargers in new homes
The City of Fremont and Rachel DiFranco, the city's Sustainability Coordinator, are leading the way to prepare their communities for the ZNE and EV future.

Energy Commission Awards More Than $36 Million for Clean Transportation
The California Energy Commission awarded more than $24 million in grants for clean energy freight transportation projects in Los Angeles and Long Beach and more than $12 million for other clean transportation projects.

California set an ambitious goal for fighting global warming. Now comes the hard part
A comprehensive article from the LA Times dives into the challenges ahead for California's ambitious climate goals.

Publications and Resources

Workbook on Proposed SB 350 2030 Energy Efficiency Savings Doubling Goal
The Energy Commission has provided an Excel workbook that contains the source data for the proposed SB 350 2030 energy efficiency savings doubling targets.

Free Fleet Sustainability Assessment from carbonBLU
The “carbonBLU Brief” is a high-level, 30,000-foot view of a fleet's sustainability including vehicle replacement scenarios.

NEEP Home Energy Management System Appliance Inventory
The Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnership (NEEP) has created an inventory of Home Energy Management System appliances.

Career Opportunities

Energy and Sustainability Analyst - Sonoma County

Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Manager - StopWaste

 



SEEC Calendar 
Click the SEEC Calendar link to view all upcoming events.
 
Register for the SEEC Forum!









5/16 - Public Works Institute-Advancing Careers in Public Works Management
Participants will learn supervisory and management skills, and will learn how to apply them to real world public works applications.

5/16 - SB 350 Low-income Barriers Study Implementation
The CEC and the CPUC will jointly conduct a workshop to discuss implementation of the SB 350 Low-Income Barriers Study

5/19 - CPUC and CEC En Banc on Community Choice Energy in California
The CPUC and CEC will hold a joint En Banc Hearing with Commissioners of both agencies attending to discuss the changing state of retail electric choice

7/28-7/29 - Zero Carbon Zero Net Energy Redwood Retreat
Join Industry Leaders As They Present Case Studies and Technical Deep Dives

10/15-10/18 Behavior, Energy & Climate Change Conference
A conference focused on understanding the behavior and decision-making of individuals and organizations and using that knowledge to accelerate our transition to an energy-efficient and low-carbon future.


That's all for this week. Have a great weekend!

Cary Garcia Jr.
Statewide Local Government Energy Efficiency Best Practices Coordinator
eecoordinator.info
 

What is this Term…Demand Response?


In the realm of energy efficiency the term demand response is being brought up more every day. Many business owners and/or homeowners do not know what the term means. Well let me dive in and break down what demand response is and how you can benefit.

What is demand response? Demand response, in lamens term, is when a customer gets paid for not using energy. These utility programs work to actively engage consumers in how they modify consumption, all while reducing peak demand and avoiding system breakdowns. Customers are able to receive incentives or discounts for participating in demand response programs through their utility supplier.

So how does demand response work?   For those not in the utility industry here is the cliff notes version of how demand response works. A utility offers credits to a consumer to install an automated device on an outside air conditioning unit. The utility is then able to turn the unit off at intervals of peak demand. Some individuals do
not care for the automated program controlling   their energy usage so utilities do offer other programs that fall under demand response. Other systems can detect when energy is at a high usage point, and then reduces voltage without cutting power altogether. [i]

Why is demand response important? Demand response is the country’s current answer to increasing energy demand.  By participating in demand response you are actively helping our utility grid work more efficiently. Predictions are that demand response can cut up to 15% of energy demand in the U.S. all while helping to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Oh and the savings of about 50% by only decreasing power use by 5% does not hurt either.


What’s the future of demand response?
The idea of demand response seems to be spreading faster than wildfire, pardon the phrase Californians. Automakers are now working on the idea for electric vehicles. Several utilities have run tests to see if cloud computing would be compatible in transporting a message directly to electric vehicles. The message is designed to ask that the car’s owner briefly suspend charging to boost grid stability. If the car owner agrees to participate, they are compensated for their energy reduction.[ii]

Whether you are a fan of the idea or not, demand response will be something to keep your eye on in the future. With the developments in only the past couple of years I am sure that there will be a lot more to come down the road.        



[i] “Demand Response- An Effective Program To Reduce Costs And Help The Environment”, Nov. 3,2014, http://www.energybiz.com/article/14/10/demand-response-effective-program-reduce-costs-and-help-environment
[ii] “ The Newest Demand Response Participant: Electric Vehicles”, November 2, 2014, http://theenergycolle.com/sbattaglia/2149791/newest-demand-response-participant-electric-vehicles ctive

Recharge stations coming for electric cars

Commercial recharging stations for electric vehicles will materialize, a new study says.

The view may sound like "the check's in the mail" response to many who purchased the first wave of electric only cars.

Boulder, Colo.-based Pike Research projects that by 2017 "more than 1.5 million locations to charge vehicles will be available in the United States, with a total of nearly 7.7 million locations worldwide."

About a third will be home-charging units.

Pike Research President Clint Wheelock and senior analyst John Gartner say electric vehicles are coming. "It is only a question of how many plug-in electric vehicles that tap into the grid for power will be driving alongside their internal combustion engine counterparts," they write.

While the electric and hybrid market remain less than 2 percent of new vehicle sales, numbers are expected to increase steadily. Going-electric.org says the most pessimistic forecasts predict that sales of electric cars, including plug-in hybrids and fuel cell vehicles, will reach 3 percent of all new cars while the most optimistic show the market segment growing to about 15 percent.

The site did predict that sometime during the next decade EV and hybrid sales "will rapidly rise to a near 100 percent." For more on the topic, go to this previous post.

Pike says the Asia Pacific region will lead charging-equipment sales. It attributes the prediction to strong government incentives and directives in China, Japan and Korea followed by increasing private sector investment.

Configurations of for-profit stations weren't discussed in the study's free executive summary, but Pike says the business model will evolve and grow as operators create new services. It also says prices for charging systems will drop by more than a third in the next six years.

Photo: Courtesy Pike Research.

EV, hybrid sales mediocre but sector expected to grow

Electric cars are coming to a lane near you, but nobody seems to know how quickly or what to what extent the U.S. consumer will switch from filling up to powering up.

While the latter term definitely sounds cool, few have adopted the concept. Edmunds Auto Observer reports that the two battery-powered vehicles and 29 hybrid models now on the market remain below 2 percent of U.S. auto sales.

"Were it not for Toyota, there'd barely have been a July hybrid market to track," writes John O'Dell for Edmonds.

Sales up in mid-summer

Sales crept up in July over the previous month but still remained below the same period a year earlier at about 18,000 hybrids and EVs. O'Dell says the high price for premium technology doesn't sell well in a soft economy, especially when small cars with conventional engines are getting such good mileage. Much of this may be due to availability of electrics, of course.

Sales forecasts show different scenarios. Two provided by going-electric.org indicate slow but steady growth over the next decade.

Going-electric says the most pessimistic forecasts predict that sales of electric cars, including plug-in hybrids and fuel cell vehicles, reach 3 percent of all new cars while the most optimistic show the market segment growing to about 15 percent.

While the site said sales through 2020 largely depend on government incentives for consumers and car makers, it did predict that sometime during the new decade EV and hybrid sales "will rapidly rise to a near 100 percent."

Some goals fall short

A new report by Boulder, Colo.-based Pike Research says that sales expectations by President Obama of 1 million plug-in electric vehicles on the streets by 2015 "appears to be well beyond what the actual vehicle market is likely to be."

Pike Research does say the annual market for plug-ins should grow to about 1.3 million vehicles by 2017, and that the overall market, with hybrids, should grow to 2.9 million. Not bad.

The U.S. Department of Energy hopes to make sure local governments are ready. DOE unveiled a couple of programs designed to help cities, counties and states design permits, provide inspectors with training and speed inspections

Standardize charging station regs

The idea is to create a standardized process and "create more favorable conditions for EV businesses, including infrastructure providers and installers, to thrive as more plug-in electric vehicles come to the market," officials said in a press release.

One of the serious downers for electric car drivers is range anxiety. Most of the cars get less than 100 miles. While no big deal for a set commute, throw in an extra trip, a wait in traffic and the driver starts worrying if he'll have to do the Fred Flintstone and push with his feet. No Yabba Dabba Do there.

However, there is some help in that department. Ariel Schwartz of fastcompany.com put together a piece on phone apps that highlight nearby charging stations. Of course those are few and far between, but more are promised.

Expect more EV sightings. I've seen Nissan Leafs when I'm least expecting it and passed a Chevy Volt down by Pixley on Highway 99.
Photo: Porsche 914 EV conversion on sale for $9,000.