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Statewide LG EE Best Practices: Weekly Update


The wEEkly Update

For Local Governments and their partners

February 05, 2018


News



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Resources and Opportunities
SEEC GHG Inventory Cohort Training for Local Governments
Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 Schools Pursuing Zero Energy
Report: Using Intelligent Efficiency to Collect and Analyze Non-energy Benefits Information
NOAA Environmental Literacy Grants
Find more resources and opportunities



Job Announcements



Upcoming events
2018 National Association of State Energy Officials Energy Policy Outlook Conference - Feb 6-9
2018 EPIC Symposium: Accelerating Clean Energy Innovation - Feb 7
Webinar: Using Data to Drive Low Income Energy Solutions: DOE Tool Demo and Case Studies - Feb 8
California Energy Efficiency Coordinating Committee Meeting: Feb. 15-1
Grid Modernization Webinar Series: Feb. 20 & Mar. 20

2nd Annual San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Summit - Mar 14-15
Yosemite Policymakers Conference - Mar 15-18
2018 Business of Clean Energy Symposium - June 4-5
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The wEEkly update for Local Governments and their partners.

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Local Government Energy Efficiency Best Practices Coordinator
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Sacramento, CA 95814

Learn how to stay safe and save energy while traveling this winter

The weather has a habit of changing pretty quickly, especially during the winter season. Powerful winter storms driven by jet streams that often exceed 200 mph can bring copious amounts of snow and ice, along with blowing snow and whiteout conditions. In some cases the temperature can drop over 50 degrees in a matter of hours.We are here to help guide you safety and conservation this winter.




Being aware of the weather conditions when traveling is crucial to ensuring a safe journey. According to the Department of Transportation, each year 24 percent of weather-related vehicle crashes occur on snowy, slushy, or icy pavement and 15 percent happen during snowfall or sleet. Over 1,300 people are killed and more than 116,800 people are injured in vehicle crashes on snowy, slushy, or icy pavement annually.
Of course, there are several steps you can take to avoid being caught unaware on the road in a hazardous winter event as well as conserve.
  • Utilize your local National Weather Service office: Fast-changing weather conditions happen just as described – fast! Just because it’s sunny and clear when you depart doesn’t mean it will stay that way for the duration of your trip. Make sure to check the hourly conditions at your local NWS office.
  • Check the road conditions along your route: Weather conditions often change quickly when you travel through locations with varying landscapes. Be sure to check the current road conditions and updated alerts or advisories for the roads and highways you will be traveling on. This site contains a comprehensive list of current road conditions listed by state.
  • Stay mobile in your mobile: Having access to the most up-to-date weather warnings and advisory information is now easier than ever. Wherever you are, you can get the local weather forecast from the National Weather Service with one click on your home screen by visiting mobile.weather.gov and bookmark it to your phone. Make sure that you have the latest weather news and information on the go so you can stay on top of fast-changing winter weather conditions.
  • Winterize your vehicle: No one likes encountering car problems at any point during the year. But fast-changing and harsh winter conditions can be particularly brutal on your vehicle. Take a look at this checklist provided by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for some tips on preparing your car for the winter.
  • Follow Speed Limits: Improve fuel efficiency by around 15 percent by driving at 55 mph rather than 65 mph.
  • Check your tire pressure: Regularly check your tire pressure. Having under inflated tires can waste gas and cause more air pollution.
  • Get out of icy situations: Bring sand or kitty litter in your trunk to get out possible icy situations. 
  • Antifreeze check-up: Make sure to use antifreeze that contains propylene glycol instead of ethylene glycol. You will help wildlife by switching since antifreeze attracts animals with its sweet smell. 
  • Have a winter weather emergency kit: Like your mother always said, “It’s better to be safe than sorry”. Even with full preparation, surprises are bound to happen with weather conditions. Make sure Mother Nature doesn’t catch you off guard by having some basic winter weather tools packed in your car at all times. Check out some of the items you should consider bringing along with this list provided by ready.gov.
Getting Traction: Tips for Travelling in Winter Weather