SJVAPCD

SJV Clean Transportation Center: April Newsletter




Welcome to the April 2018 San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center Newsletter. With funding from the California Energy Commission, CALSTART opened the Center with the goal to accelerate the use of clean vehicles and fuels in order to help the region more quickly meet air quality targets.


SJV Clean Transportation Summit Drives Theme of Clean Air & A Healthy Economy 

The 2018 San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Summit – hosted by the Fresno State Transportation Institute and CALSTART, in partnership with Fresno State’s Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED) and Project Clean Air – was successful in bringing awareness of the necessity of transforming transportation to promote a healthier San Joaquin Valley.
More than 200 attendees participated in the two-day event in Fresno March 14-15, featuring 30 vendors at the forefront of revolutionizing the clean transportation industry. Vehicle displays and ride-and-drive demonstrations were located throughout the Save Mart Center parking lots, highlighting the latest electric and natural gas vehicles for commercial and personal use.
Eight breakout sessions explored air quality and transportation issues in the San Joaquin Valley, as well as opportunities for progressing toward cleaner transportation. Sessions focused on converting to natural gas from diesel fuel, the impact of California High-Speed Rail on the region, the challenge of and solutions to connecting rural cities to major urban areas, and other timely topics.
The event concluded with the Funders Forum, where representatives from the Fresno Council of Governments, San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District, California Transportation Commission, Center for Sustainable Energy and CALSTART provided an overview of more than $220 million in funding available to the Valley for clean air projects. The goal of the funding is to continue to progress toward clean energy transformation that promotes healthier living conditions and increased economic activity for our region.
More information about the Summit, including coverage from Fresno's KSEE television station and links to presentations, is available on the SJV Clean Transportation Center website.


Valley Air District Board Approves New Funding for Truck Replacement Program  


The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD) gave the region's trucking fleets a major boost when its Governing Board on March 15 approved a new funding program to replace diesel trucks with new zero-emission electric or near-zero compressed natural gas engines.

Formerly known as the Truck Voucher Program (TVP), it now simply will be called the Truck Replacement Program, SJVAPCD Strategies and Incentives Manager Todd DeYoung told those attending the Funders Forum at the SJV Clean Transportation Summit, speaking just hours after the Governing Board voted on the program changes.

Several speakers at the Summit noted that an incentive of $70,000 or more per truck is needed to make it economically feasible for fleets to convert from diesel engines to the new near-zero, low-NOx engines now available from Cummins Westport and sold by numerous manufacturers. New funding levels will range from $100,000 for these new CNG engines to $200,000 for an all-electric truck (see graphic above for details). Heavy-duty diesel trucks are the single largest contributor of NOx emissions in the Valley.

Rather than requiring 2010 and newer diesel trucks to be destroyed, said DeYoung, the Air District is creating a trade-up feature for those trucks to be used by smaller fleets and agricultural operations, which then would destroy and older, higher-polluting truck. For fleet expansion when no existing vehicle is being retired, a grant of $20,000 would be available per truck.

DeYoung said the $20,000 grant could be combined with funding from the Hybrid and Zero-Emission Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project (HVIP), which is administered by CALSTART. Visit the
HVIP website for more information. View the Governing Board presentation for more details on the Truck Replacement Program.



A total of 525 test drives were conducted in Fresno during Electrify America's Drive and Discover Tour March 5-7 at Fashion Fair Mall – more than any other market, including Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose and Sacramento. Because of that success, additional tour events are scheduled April 3-4 in Bakersfield and April 7-8 in Stockton.

Electrify America Discover and Drive Tour Coming to Bakersfield, Stockton in April   

Volkswagen's Electrify America Discover and Drive Tour was so successful in Fresno that additional events have been added for Bakersfield and Stockton in early April. The tour showcases electric vehicles (EVs) and charging, with several EVs available to test drive, including the BMW i3, Chevrolet Bolt, Nissan Leaf, Tesla Model S and Volkswagen e-Golf, as well as the battery-electric and hydrogen fuel cell powered Honda Clarity models.

The tour will be in Bakersfield April 3-4 at Bakersfield Plaza, 4200 California Ave., and in Stockton April 8 at Weberstown Mall, 4950 Pacific Ave., from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day. The tour also will be at the Stockton Tune In and Tune Up event, 1658 South Airport Way, from 6:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 7. In Fresno, the three-day event at Fashion Fair Mall had 525 test drives – the most of any of the tour's markets – even though it was on Monday to Wednesday.

"It was clear to all of us that there was significant demand in Fresno, and residents were really interested in learning more about electric cars," said Catherine Teebay, program manager for FORTH, which is conducting the tour as part of Electrify America’s initial $200 million investment in California to increase access to EVs and adoption through brand-neutral education and promotional activities.
Added materials about used EVs in addition to rebates and incentives will be featured. Admission is free and advance registration is not required but can be done online to speed up the sign-in process at the event.



Four new Pipistrel Alpha Electro two-seat electric training airplanes arrived in Fresno in March. The all-electric aircraft are part of a new pilot-training program administered by CALSTART's San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center, with grant funding from the Fresno County Transportation Authority.  

Nation's First Production Electric Aircraft Makes History Taking Flight in Fresno

The San Joaquin Valley now is home to the largest concentration of production electric aircraft in the world! Four Pipistrel Alpha Electro two-seat electric training airplanes were delivered to Fresno Chandler Executive Airport in March. San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center Director Joseph Oldham, who also has been a pilot for more than 40 years, is the innovator behind CALSTART's Sustainable Aviation Project, which will be the nation's first flight training program using electric aircraft.

With slightly more than $1 million in funding from the Fresno County Transportation Authority, the program is a partnership with the cities of Mendota and Reedley that includes $90,000 in training assistance grant funds for youth from disadvantaged communities in Fresno County. The planes will operate at  Fresno Chandler Executive Airport and the municipal airports in Reedley and Mendota.

"Had I not known Joseph and that he could deliver, I would have laughed him out the door," said Nicole Zieba, Reedley's City Manager. She noted that the nation, and even the world, is facing a pilot shortage. This project brings the hope of a high-paying job to youth living in an area that still has high unemployment, she noted. "We are going to change lives," Zieba said.

Oldham piloted one of the Alpha Electro planes on its first flight March 23 from Fresno Chandler Executive Airport. "This truly was a historic event," he said. "It was the first flight of a production electric aircraft in the U.S.!"

Check out this video of that historic flight. To learn more about the project, read the Sustainable Aviation Project Blog or website.



Crimson Renewable Energy, LP, is the state's largest producer of ultra-low carbon biodiesel. The Bakersfield plant's current production level generates emissions and carbon reduction benefits equivalent to taking 53,000 cars off the road. 

Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Helping California Meet Renewable Fuel Standard 

Richard Nelson, Ph.D., representing the National Biodiesel Board, and Daniel Burns from the Renewable Energy Group, Inc., (REG) spoke to a group of diesel fleet operators in Bakersfield. The March 21 breakfast meeting was hosted by Wholesale Fuels, Inc., to help inform the group about what is in the diesel fuel they are using.

Diesel fuel often contains up to 5 percent biodiesel. Looking at the bill of lading, not just the invoice, will show what is in the fuel, the presenters advised. B20, up to 20 percent biodiesel, up to B100, or pure biodiesel, are available. California requires biodiesel to have a NOx mitigant such as CATANOX or VESTA, Nelson noted. The presenters also cautioned that diesel storage tanks should be cleaned before storing since biodiesel breaks down accumulated sediments and may lead to clogged fuel filters.

In addition to being North America's largest producer of biodiesel, REG produces Renewable Hydrocarbon Diesel (RHD) and offers blends of both products to maximize the benefits of both fuels. As a 100 percent hydrocarbon product, RHD can be blended with biodiesel and petroleum diesel. It qualifies for various state biofuel tax incentives.

Norm Ueunten of Crimson Renewable Energy, LP, located in Bakersfield, also attended the meeting. Crimson is the largest producer of ultra-low carbon biodiesel in California and distributes biodiesel to the wholesale market in the Western U.S. The California Energy Commission (CEC) in January awarded a $4.4 million grant to Crimson from the Alternative and Renewable Fuels and Vehicle Technology Program to design and operate an advanced commercial scale refinery that converts low-value feedstocks such as trap grease, inedible animal fats and soap stocks into biodiesel fuel. Crimson previously received CEC funding to upgrade its plant.

The U.S. implemented the Renewable Fuels Standard in 2007 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation fuels. California has expanded on these efforts with the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) program. 
Quotes from the SJV Clean Transportation Summit March 14-15

"CALSTART's membership now includes more than 185 global companies. We bring the resources of all of these companies to the Valley as partners to reduce emissions."
John Boesel
President and CEO, CALSTART

"The transportation sector emits 80 percent of the region's smog and nearly 40 percent of greenhouse gasses. The largest contributor is heavy-duty diesel trucks.... Natural gas trucks are clean, abundant, affordable and available now."
Michelle Sim
Southern California Gas Co.


"Zero is better than .02. But it isn't when it's not available for the vehicles you need. We don't want to wait a decade."
Tom Jordan
San Joaquin Valley Air  Pollution Control District


"The fuel of the future has arrived. RNG is the most environmentally friendly and most cost-effective fuel for the movement of heavy-duty transportation vehicles."
Anthony Tarabini
Biorem Energy

"We will not get to cleaner air by regulation alone. Incentives play a key role."
Todd DeYoung
San Joaquin Valley Air  Pollution Control District


"At the end of the day, if we make some change, then it will have all been worthwhile."
Joseph Oldham
San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center

SJVCTC Newsletter Ceasing Publication

With the California Energy Commission grant that has provided funding for the San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center (SJVCTC) ending soon, this will be the last issue of our SJVCTC Newsletter.

The CALSTART offices in Fresno and Stockton will remain open as we continue to work on projects with other funding sources. Please check our website for future news and information updates. 


News Briefs

PG&E, SCE OFFERING CUSTOMERS $10,000 INCENTIVE FOR BMW i3

Several utilities, including PG&E and Southern California Edison, are offering their customers an additional $10,000 incentive on the purchase of a BMW i3 or i3s for a limited time.

The deadline is April 30 for SCE customers, while PG&E customers have until May 31 to take advantage of this program. Both utility programs only are available for vehicle purchases, not leases. 

This incentive is in addition to the federal tax credit and
California and San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District rebates that together amount to $13,000 or more, depending on income and eligibility. Residential EV owners also may qualify for rebate of $450 from SCE and $500 from PG&E.      

LIGHT-DUTY PUBLIC FLEET INCENTIVES NOW PART OF CVRP 

The Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE) recently announced that the Public Fleet Pilot Project now is part of the state's Clean Vehicle Rebate Project (CVRP). New funding levels also were announced, with public fleets in disadvantaged area census (DAC) tracts eligible for higher rebate amounts when purchasing light-duty vehicles.

Since 2014, more than 620 electric vehicles statewide have received substantial rebates through the Public Fleet Pilot Project, which is funded by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and administered by CSE.

As part of the CVRP public fleet incentives, all public fleets now can apply for multiple rebates in a single online application. Public agencies are eligible for up to 30 rebates annually. Public fleets also can reserve rebates up to six months prior to vehicle delivery and up to 18 months after delivery. 


Plug-in hybrid EVs are eligible for the standard CVRP rebate of $1,500 per vehicle, and those in DACs are eligible for an increased rebate of $3,500. Battery or range-extended vehicles are eligible for a rebate of $2,500, increasing to $4,500 for vehicles domiciled in a DAC. Another change to the public fleet program is that zero-emission motorcycles no longer are being funded. Fuel-cell vehicles are eligible for a $5,000 rebate and $7,000 in a DAC location. For more information or to check the map of DAC locations, visit CSE's public fleets website
 
DOE SELECTS EDI FOR ELECTRIC SCHOOL BUS PROGRAM

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected California-based Efficient Drivetrains, Inc. (EDI) as the electric drivetrain provider for a $4.4-million DOE program that aims to accelerate the adoption of alternative fuel vehicles. With matching funds from other public and private entities, total program funding exceeds $9 million. 
School buses continue to be the largest mass transit segment in the country, carrying twice the number of passengers as the entire U.S. transit and rail segments.
As part of the program, EDI will supply its EDI PowerDrive 7000ev electric drivetrain and its EDI Power2E exportable power solution to a leading school bus OEM to develop a fleet of electric buses with Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) capabilities.
The bus offers more than 100 miles of range, delivers power performance equivalent to its diesel counterpart, and requires no change to driver behavior. EDI already has collaborated with several OEMs to electrify buses.

CARB'S ONE-STOP TRUCK EVENT SET FOR BAKERSFIELD 

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) will have a One-Stop Diesel Truck Event on Tuesday, April 17, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Kern County Fairgrounds, 1142 South P Street, in Bakersfield. One-on-one assistance will be available. See the One-Stop Truck Event website for information or to register,  

Looking for Grant Information?

The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District offers a variety of grants and incentive programs for public agencies, residents, businesses and technology. Interested parties should apply early since incentives typically are available on a first-come, first-served basis. A complete list of current incentive programs is available on the Air District website.

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) administers grant programs funded through various sources, including the cap-and-trade program. A list of the various funding programs is available on the
CARB website.

The California Energy Commission (CEC) also administers grant programs for transportation technology. Go to the 
CEC website for information.

Various federal agencies offer grants and incentives for transportation technology each year. Federal agencies use the
Grants.gov website for submitting grant applications. 
 


“The CALSTART San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center is a joint project between CALSTART and the California Energy Commission (CEC). It is funded through a grant from the CEC with the mission to assist residents and businesses in the San Joaquin Valley deploy cleaner transportation options to help improve air quality and promote economic prosperity.  For more information about CALSTART, visit www.calstart.org.”

Copyright © 2018 by CALSTART, All rights reserved.

Contact Us
Joseph Oldham, Director     Thomas Paddon, Regional Project Manager
San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center
Fresno Address: 510 W. Kearney Blvd., Fresno, CA 93706
Fresno Phone: (559) 797-6034
Stockton Address: 5000 S. Airport Way, Suite #208, Stockton, CA 95206
Stockton Phone: (626) 744-5637
Email: joldham@calstart.org and tpaddon@calstart.org
Website: www.sjvcleantransportation.org

Newsletter Editor: Brenda Turner, Project Clean Air
projectcleanairprograms@gmail.com

SJV Clean Transportation Center: Dec./Jan. Newsletter


Welcome to the December 2017 San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center Newsletter. With funding from the California Energy Commission, CALSTART opened the Center with the goal to accelerate the use of clean vehicles and fuels and help the region more quickly meet air quality targets.


San Joaquin Valley to Receive More Than $88 Million in State Cap-and-Trade Funds 

The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD) Governing Board at its Dec. 21 meeting voted to accept more than $88 million in funding from the state's cap-and-trade proceeds. The Valley is receiving $80 million – nearly a third of $250 million allocated by the California Air Resources Board (CARB)  to fund Carl Moyer projects and clean trucks that meet Prop 1B guidelines.

Another $8.4 million is for AB 617 implementation, which requires air monitoring at the community level in order to better protect those in areas most impacted by air pollution.

Even better news is that significantly more money will be heading to the San Joaquin Valley. (See graphic above from the presentation made to the SJVAPCD Board.) The Air District expects to receive millions more for dairy digesters, several programs targeting emissions reductions in agriculture, and greenhouse gas projects for food processors.

"It's the most we have ever seen, and perhaps the most we will ever get," President/CEO Roger Isom of the California Cotton Ginners & Growers Association said during public comments made at the meeting. He encouraged the Air District to move quickly to get the funding distributed. The state has set strict deadlines, mandated by law, requiring funds to be encumbered (under executed contract) by June 30, 2019, and liquidated (paid out) by June 30, 2021.

Biorem Energy President Mark Terry, who traveled from Idaho to attend the meeting, encouraged the Air District to examine existing funding criteria for heavy-duty trucks so that larger trucking companies would have more of an incentive to convert diesel trucks in their fleets to compressed natural gas (CNG). He suggested a trade-up component as well, where high-mileage trucks that may only be three to five years old would not need to be destroyed. SJVAPCD Air Pollution Control Officer Seyed Sadredin indicated they are working with CARB to allow a trade-up provision.    



A DC fast charger opened recently at Kern Federal Credit Union, becoming the first level 3 charger in downtown Bakersfield. The Air District's Charge Up! program, which helped fund this project, recently was expanded to include workplace charging sites.

Charge Up! Expands to Workplace Sites; New EV Funds Target Fresno County 

The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District's (SJVAPCD) Charge Up! program, which provides funding for EV charging equipment and infrastructure, is expanding to include workplace charging. The program previously required chargers to be open to the public for a minimum of 30 hours per week.

Charge Up! also will shift to a voucher-based system from a rebate program to increase program participation, efficiency and flexibility, resulting in an overall streamlining of the program. A new application will be available soon. To date, $1.3 million has been awarded by the Air District for 182 level 2 and level 3 EV chargers

A new state program debuted Dec. 20 in Fresno County, providing $4 million in new funding for EV charging and infrastructure projects. The Fresno County Incentive Project (FCIP) is the first incentive project to be launched under the California Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Project (CALeVIP).

FCIP will provide rebates for the purchase and installation of eligible level 2 electric vehicle chargers to owners of commercial properties, apartments, condominiums, workplaces and public agencies in Fresno County. Rebate amounts are up to $4,000 for single-port EV charging stations and $7,000 for dual-port EV charging stations. FCIP funding may be combined with Charge Up!, which offers $5,000 per unit for single-port chargers and $6,000 per unit for dual-port chargers. Charge Up! also will fund up to $25,000 for DC fast chargers, with funding approved on a case-by-case basis.

CALeVIP is funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and implemented by the Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE), which also administers the state's Clean Vehicle Rebate Project (CVRP). CALeVIP currently is funded for more than $15 million, with the potential to receive up to $200 million.

“As the state transitions to cleaner transportation in order to meet clean air standards and climate goals, it’s important to increase access to the charging infrastructure that makes plug-in electric vehicles a more viable option for communities across California,” Energy Commissioner Janea A. Scott said in an article posted on CSE's website.

An application and guidelines are on the FCIP website. Read the entire CSE article for more information



Two Proterra Catalyst buses will be added to Yosemite's shuttle fleet in late 2018, making it the first U.S. national park to permanently add battery-electric, zero-emission buses to its fleet. 

Yosemite Becomes First U.S. National Park to Purchase Electric Buses 

Yosemite National Park will add two Proterra Catalyst electric buses to its fleet, becoming the first U.S. national park to permanently add zero-emission, battery-electric buses to its shuttle fleet. The buses will begin service in late 2018 and will operate throughout the year, transporting up to 1,480 visitors per day.

One of the nation's most-visited national parks, Yosemite attracts more than five million visitors from around the world each year. Increased vehicle congestion has contributed to air pollution and noise problems in the park, and Yosemite relies heavily on its shuttle program to encourage visitors to park once and use a bus to circulate among lodges, waterfalls and trailheads. This free shuttle service travels approximately 436,000 miles with 3.8 million boardings annually. 
In 2001, the park began replacing its diesel bus fleet with diesel-electric hybrid vehicles. The new Proterra Catalyst buses are expected annually to reduce 887,000 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions and save approximately $150,500 on maintenance and operating costs. 
“Since its establishment in 1890, airborne pollutants have steadily degraded Yosemite’s resources," said Yosemite National Park Acting Superintendent Chip Jenkins. "Deploying Proterra’s battery-electric buses will help with this ongoing challenge and will greatly improve local air quality.”
The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) has committed to greening the federal fleet, including the national parks, by working with businesses to make cleaner, quieter transportation readily available and affordable to partner agencies. As a resullt, GSA's list of federal fleet acquisition options now includes the Proterra Catalyst.
“The Proterra team is especially proud to directly contribute to the preservation of Yosemite National Park.," said Proterra President and CEO Ryan Popple. "We are honored to partner with the National Park Service to provide clean, quiet transportation to the millions of visitors who love to visit our national parks.”

With its headquarters in Burlingame, Proterra also has offices in the Los Angeles area in the City of Industry and in Greenville, South Carolina. The company currently has more than 490 electric buses operating in 61 different municipal, university, airport and commercial transit agencies in 29 states.



Thomas Paddon 

Paddon Joins SJVCTC Staff  

Thomas Paddon is the new Regional Project Manager for CALSTART's San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center (SJVCTC), joining the staff in December. He currently is working with SJVCTC Director Joseph Oldham to open a new office in Stockton and will be responsible for driving the Center’s objectives in the northern San Joaquin Valley, taking a pragmatic, economics-driven approach to accelerating the growth of clean transportation technologies.

Prior to CALSTART, he spent many years helping to develop startup businesses, primarily in the solar and electric vehicle space. Most recently, he was working with a solar software startup whose mission was to speed the adoption of solar, battery storage and electric vehicle investments using electricity usage data.

Paddon earned his master of arts degree in Management from the University of Redlands and a bachelor of arts degree in French and International Business from the University of South Florida. As a commercial pilot, he is excited to be a part of CALSTART’s Sustainable Aviation Project that features electric aircraft.

The mission of the SJVCTC is to provide no-cost technical assistance, project development expertise and assistance with acquiring project funding to San Joaquin Valley vehicle fleet owners, businesses and residents with the goal of reducing vehicle emissions and improving air quality. To help achieve that mission, the Center is working with the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District, SoCalGas Co., Pacific Gas and Electric Co. and others to speed the deployment of electric vehicle charging stations and natural gas fueling infrastructure.

News Briefs... 

FEDERAL EV CREDIT SURVIVES IN INCOME TAX REFORM BILL

Those looking to buy an electric vehicle in 2018 can breathe a sigh of relief. The federal EV income tax credit of up to $7,500 has been retained in the $1.5 trillion tax overhaul package signed by President Donald J. Trump on Dec. 22.

The credit had been eliminated in the House proposal drafted by Republicans several weeks ago, but was included in the Senate's version of the tax bill. That led to speculation in recent weeks about the fate of this important incentive for EV buyers and the potential impact on the EV industry. 

CALSTART, in a letter signed by many of its more than 180 member companies, lobbied to keep the credit, stating that it "protects U.S. job creation and leadership in the electric vehicle sector." See a
USA Today article for more details.

SHEIKH TO SUCCEED SADREDIN AS SJVAPCD APCO

Seyed Sadredin has announced he will retire in 2018 after leading the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District since 2006. His career in air quality has spanned more than three decades.

Samir Sheikh will succeed Sadredin as the District's Air Pollution Control Officer (APCO), effective July 7. A longtime Air District employee, Sheikh currently serves as Deputy APCO with leadership over the Strategies and Incentives Department and several other administrative areas of the organization.    

Looking for Grant Information?

The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District offers a variety of grants and incentive programs for public agencies, residents, businesses and technology. Interested parties should apply early since incentives typically are available on a first-come, first-served basis. A complete list of current incentive programs is available on the Air District website.

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) administers grant programs funded through various sources, including the cap-and-trade program. A complete list of the various funding programs is available on the
CARB website.

The California Energy Commission (CEC) also administers grant programs for transportation technology. Go to the 
CEC website for information.

Various federal agencies offer grants and incentives for transportation technology each year. All federal agencies use the
Grants.gov website for submitting and receiving grant applications. 
 


“The CALSTART San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center is a joint project between CALSTART and the California Energy Commission (CEC). It is funded through a grant from the CEC with the mission to assist residents and businesses in the San Joaquin Valley deploy cleaner transportation options to help improve air quality and promote economic prosperity.  For more information about CALSTART, visit www.calstart.org.”

Copyright © 2017 by CALSTART, All rights reserved.

Contact Us
Joseph Oldham, Director    Thomas Paddon, Regional Project Manager
San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center
Fresno Address: 510 W. Kearney Blvd., Fresno, CA 93706
Fresno Phone: (559) 797-6034
Stockton Address: 5000 S. Airport Way, Suite #208, Stockton, CA 95206
Stockton Phone: (626) 744-5637
Email: joldham@calstart.org and tpaddon@calstart.org

Newsletter Editor: Brenda Turner, Project Clean Air
projectcleanairprograms@gmail.com

UPCOMING LEARNING SESSION: CNG Listen and Learn



With funding from the California Energy Commission, CALSTART opened the San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center with the goal to accelerate the use of clean vehicles and fuels and help the region more quickly meet its air quality targets. 



For those outside of the area who are unable to attend in person, a call-in conference line will be available. For more information, contact the San Joaquin Valley Clean Cities Coalition at projectcleanairprograms@gmail.com


Copyright © 2017 by CALSTART, All rights reserved.

Contact Us
Joseph Oldham, Director
San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center
Address: 510 W. Kearney Blvd., Fresno, CA 93706
Phone: (559)797-6034
Email: joldham@calstart.org
Website: www.sjvcleantransportation.org

FUNDING OPEN NOW: Goods Movement Emission Reduction Program






Proposition 1B Funding OPEN NOW Until July 28!
Valley Air District Accepting Applications to Replace Class 5-8 Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks or Engines


The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD) is accepting applications until July 28 for the Proposition 1B: Goods Movement Emission Reduction Program. About $15 million is available for heavy-duty diesel truck replacement projects in this round of funding. These incentives are intended to quickly reduce air pollution emissions and health risks from heavy-duty diesel trucks moving freight along California's trade corridors.

Financial incentives will be provided to owners of equipment used in freight movement to upgrade to cleaner technologies through truck replacement or engine replacement. Note that this is a replacement program and does not fund new additional truck purchases.The existing truck or engine must be scrapped or surrendered in accordance with program guidelines. This also is not a rebate program. Trucks funded by this program can only be purchased after a contract is signed and executed between the equipment owner and the SJVAPCD.

Heavy-duty diesel trucks used to move goods (a majority of the time) for the past two years, with an original manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 16,001 lbs. or greater (Class 5-8) are eligible for the program. Eligible trucks also must currently be registered in California and present evidence of California registration for the past two years. In addition, trucks must have operated at least 75 percent of the time in California and 10 percent within the SJVAPCD boundaries. Annual vehicle miles traveled requirements must be met as well (at least 20,000 miles annually for Class 7 and 8 and at least 10,000 miles annually for Class 5 and 6 trucks).


The District may provide direct assistance for applicants at its offices, but no further information or schedule is available at this time. For full application guidelines, visit the Prop 1B page on the SJVAPCD website or call the District's Heavy-Duty Engine Program at (599) 230-5800 and ask to speak to someone about Prop 1B funding.



NRG eVgo Freedom Stations in the SJV

Electric Vehicles (EVs) and EV charging sites are gaining some real traction and prominence in the San Joaquin Valley. Hooray! This means, now that charging infrastructure development has taken off, it is making more and more sense to own an EV in this part of California.

Photo Source: www.insideevs.com
We owe a big thanks to NRG eVgo for three of the SJV’s stations and this number will grow exponentially this year. These stations are at the Fresh and Easy in Hayward, the Applegate Plaza in Atwater and Fashion Fair Mall in Fresno. The Fashion Fair station is the newest and there will be a ribbon-cutting ceremony in the coming weeks.

NRG eVgo is dedicated to minimizing any possible downsides to driving and owning an electric car; the company has set out to make the experience as simple as driving a gas-powered vehicle. Range is one of the things electric car owners and prospective owners worry about most and NRG eVgo wants to eliminate any range anxiety with its ever-growing network of “Freedom Stations”.

NRG eVgo has begun development of its charging station network in the states of California and Texas as well as the Cities of Atlanta, Nashville, Chicago, and Washington D.C. For Earth Day, NRG eVgo helped host an EV caravan in Atlanta to promote the Freedom Stations around the city. Included in this event were demonstrations on how to charge a variety of electric vehicles.

Photo Source: www.businesswire.com
If you’d like to charge at home, NRG eVgo has a home car charging dock as well. You can get information on the best charger for your home and vehicle or even suggest a multi-family home or workplace that should be approached and considered for an EV Charging Station install.


The NRG eVgo network of Freedom Stations is quickly growing! This infrastructure development and the incentives offered from the federal government, the CA Air Pollution Control District, etc. should be reason enough to consider purchasing an EV!

NRG eVgo isn't the only company expanding the SJV's EV Charging Station Network. Residences and businesses all over the Valley are seeing the importance and advantage of installing EV chargers. If you own an EV or are considering purchasing one, but are deterred by potential range anxiety, look at the Plug Share app. The map features residential chargers, high powered chargers (i.e. Tesla Superchargers), and public business or municipal stations. The app will even warn you when a particular charger is in use. Range Anxiety no more!



SJVCEO Monthly Update - What Have We Been Up To?


Over the past month our new SJVCEO team has been on the move and pushing forward! Our team members have been learning the new technologies our utility partners are rolling out, gearing up for community events as well as moving forward with some of our grant extensions.

Our team has completed the Energy Insight training with one of our utility partners; PG&E. Energy Insight will allow our team members to have a clear picture of where our energy efficiency projects stand with our outside contractors and PG&E. This database allows our members to follow projects from cradle to grave to make sure our customers are fully satisfied.

With October being energy awareness month we are gearing up for our community outreach events. These community outreach events allow the SJVCEO team to get out into the community and show how easy and affordable it is to make energy efficiency updates. We hope you will stay tuned to the SJVCEO website as well as social media sites, twitter and facebook, for upcoming events.

SJVCEO along with the other SJV Action Team Members – Fresno State Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED), San Joaquin Valley Clean Cities Coalition (SJVCCC), San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD), and the Kern Community College District (KCCD) – for the Workforce Investment Board Regional Industry Clusters of Opportunity (WIB RICO) grant have received an extension of funding to continue supporting and expanding the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology (ARFVT) industry in the Valley. We have created two new Valley-based Partnerships to support this effort; the CNG Partnership and EV Partnership have gained interest from dealerships, fueling and charging station manufacturers and deployment, automotive repair establishments, school districts, etc. Our goal is to clean up the Valley’s air, cut down on GHG emissions from transportation, build a more extensive and sustainable network of alternative fueling stations, and educate the Valley’s residents about the importance and benefits of owning and/or using a cleaner vehicle.

SJVCEO is conducting preliminary research on developing a Cool Roof Policy in the Valley. The Valley suffers from Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which contributes to poorer air quality, quality of life, life expectancy, and a higher demand for cooling capabilities. Introducing a Cool Roof Ordinance could decrease cooling costs in the summer, improve air quality and decrease number of health issues related to excessive heat. In addition, a Cool Roof Ordinance could include measures such as cool playgrounds and parking lots, which would extend people’s abilities to stay outside and enjoy outdoor activities thus improving their quality of life in the Valley.
          
Lastly, SJVCEO is continuously developing a project tracking database. This database will provide a centralized location of data from multiple sources including Energy Star Portfolio Manager and the Utilities Program Management. Current plans of the database will be ready to share at the Local Government Commission for Central California in Paso Robles on October 10th.

Stay tuned for next month’s update on what the SJVCEO team has been up to!