Yosemite

SJV Clean Transportation Center: Dec./Jan. Newsletter


Welcome to the December 2017 San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center Newsletter. With funding from the California Energy Commission, CALSTART opened the Center with the goal to accelerate the use of clean vehicles and fuels and help the region more quickly meet air quality targets.


San Joaquin Valley to Receive More Than $88 Million in State Cap-and-Trade Funds 

The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District (SJVAPCD) Governing Board at its Dec. 21 meeting voted to accept more than $88 million in funding from the state's cap-and-trade proceeds. The Valley is receiving $80 million – nearly a third of $250 million allocated by the California Air Resources Board (CARB)  to fund Carl Moyer projects and clean trucks that meet Prop 1B guidelines.

Another $8.4 million is for AB 617 implementation, which requires air monitoring at the community level in order to better protect those in areas most impacted by air pollution.

Even better news is that significantly more money will be heading to the San Joaquin Valley. (See graphic above from the presentation made to the SJVAPCD Board.) The Air District expects to receive millions more for dairy digesters, several programs targeting emissions reductions in agriculture, and greenhouse gas projects for food processors.

"It's the most we have ever seen, and perhaps the most we will ever get," President/CEO Roger Isom of the California Cotton Ginners & Growers Association said during public comments made at the meeting. He encouraged the Air District to move quickly to get the funding distributed. The state has set strict deadlines, mandated by law, requiring funds to be encumbered (under executed contract) by June 30, 2019, and liquidated (paid out) by June 30, 2021.

Biorem Energy President Mark Terry, who traveled from Idaho to attend the meeting, encouraged the Air District to examine existing funding criteria for heavy-duty trucks so that larger trucking companies would have more of an incentive to convert diesel trucks in their fleets to compressed natural gas (CNG). He suggested a trade-up component as well, where high-mileage trucks that may only be three to five years old would not need to be destroyed. SJVAPCD Air Pollution Control Officer Seyed Sadredin indicated they are working with CARB to allow a trade-up provision.    



A DC fast charger opened recently at Kern Federal Credit Union, becoming the first level 3 charger in downtown Bakersfield. The Air District's Charge Up! program, which helped fund this project, recently was expanded to include workplace charging sites.

Charge Up! Expands to Workplace Sites; New EV Funds Target Fresno County 

The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District's (SJVAPCD) Charge Up! program, which provides funding for EV charging equipment and infrastructure, is expanding to include workplace charging. The program previously required chargers to be open to the public for a minimum of 30 hours per week.

Charge Up! also will shift to a voucher-based system from a rebate program to increase program participation, efficiency and flexibility, resulting in an overall streamlining of the program. A new application will be available soon. To date, $1.3 million has been awarded by the Air District for 182 level 2 and level 3 EV chargers

A new state program debuted Dec. 20 in Fresno County, providing $4 million in new funding for EV charging and infrastructure projects. The Fresno County Incentive Project (FCIP) is the first incentive project to be launched under the California Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Project (CALeVIP).

FCIP will provide rebates for the purchase and installation of eligible level 2 electric vehicle chargers to owners of commercial properties, apartments, condominiums, workplaces and public agencies in Fresno County. Rebate amounts are up to $4,000 for single-port EV charging stations and $7,000 for dual-port EV charging stations. FCIP funding may be combined with Charge Up!, which offers $5,000 per unit for single-port chargers and $6,000 per unit for dual-port chargers. Charge Up! also will fund up to $25,000 for DC fast chargers, with funding approved on a case-by-case basis.

CALeVIP is funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and implemented by the Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE), which also administers the state's Clean Vehicle Rebate Project (CVRP). CALeVIP currently is funded for more than $15 million, with the potential to receive up to $200 million.

“As the state transitions to cleaner transportation in order to meet clean air standards and climate goals, it’s important to increase access to the charging infrastructure that makes plug-in electric vehicles a more viable option for communities across California,” Energy Commissioner Janea A. Scott said in an article posted on CSE's website.

An application and guidelines are on the FCIP website. Read the entire CSE article for more information



Two Proterra Catalyst buses will be added to Yosemite's shuttle fleet in late 2018, making it the first U.S. national park to permanently add battery-electric, zero-emission buses to its fleet. 

Yosemite Becomes First U.S. National Park to Purchase Electric Buses 

Yosemite National Park will add two Proterra Catalyst electric buses to its fleet, becoming the first U.S. national park to permanently add zero-emission, battery-electric buses to its shuttle fleet. The buses will begin service in late 2018 and will operate throughout the year, transporting up to 1,480 visitors per day.

One of the nation's most-visited national parks, Yosemite attracts more than five million visitors from around the world each year. Increased vehicle congestion has contributed to air pollution and noise problems in the park, and Yosemite relies heavily on its shuttle program to encourage visitors to park once and use a bus to circulate among lodges, waterfalls and trailheads. This free shuttle service travels approximately 436,000 miles with 3.8 million boardings annually. 
In 2001, the park began replacing its diesel bus fleet with diesel-electric hybrid vehicles. The new Proterra Catalyst buses are expected annually to reduce 887,000 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions and save approximately $150,500 on maintenance and operating costs. 
“Since its establishment in 1890, airborne pollutants have steadily degraded Yosemite’s resources," said Yosemite National Park Acting Superintendent Chip Jenkins. "Deploying Proterra’s battery-electric buses will help with this ongoing challenge and will greatly improve local air quality.”
The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) has committed to greening the federal fleet, including the national parks, by working with businesses to make cleaner, quieter transportation readily available and affordable to partner agencies. As a resullt, GSA's list of federal fleet acquisition options now includes the Proterra Catalyst.
“The Proterra team is especially proud to directly contribute to the preservation of Yosemite National Park.," said Proterra President and CEO Ryan Popple. "We are honored to partner with the National Park Service to provide clean, quiet transportation to the millions of visitors who love to visit our national parks.”

With its headquarters in Burlingame, Proterra also has offices in the Los Angeles area in the City of Industry and in Greenville, South Carolina. The company currently has more than 490 electric buses operating in 61 different municipal, university, airport and commercial transit agencies in 29 states.



Thomas Paddon 

Paddon Joins SJVCTC Staff  

Thomas Paddon is the new Regional Project Manager for CALSTART's San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center (SJVCTC), joining the staff in December. He currently is working with SJVCTC Director Joseph Oldham to open a new office in Stockton and will be responsible for driving the Center’s objectives in the northern San Joaquin Valley, taking a pragmatic, economics-driven approach to accelerating the growth of clean transportation technologies.

Prior to CALSTART, he spent many years helping to develop startup businesses, primarily in the solar and electric vehicle space. Most recently, he was working with a solar software startup whose mission was to speed the adoption of solar, battery storage and electric vehicle investments using electricity usage data.

Paddon earned his master of arts degree in Management from the University of Redlands and a bachelor of arts degree in French and International Business from the University of South Florida. As a commercial pilot, he is excited to be a part of CALSTART’s Sustainable Aviation Project that features electric aircraft.

The mission of the SJVCTC is to provide no-cost technical assistance, project development expertise and assistance with acquiring project funding to San Joaquin Valley vehicle fleet owners, businesses and residents with the goal of reducing vehicle emissions and improving air quality. To help achieve that mission, the Center is working with the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District, SoCalGas Co., Pacific Gas and Electric Co. and others to speed the deployment of electric vehicle charging stations and natural gas fueling infrastructure.

News Briefs... 

FEDERAL EV CREDIT SURVIVES IN INCOME TAX REFORM BILL

Those looking to buy an electric vehicle in 2018 can breathe a sigh of relief. The federal EV income tax credit of up to $7,500 has been retained in the $1.5 trillion tax overhaul package signed by President Donald J. Trump on Dec. 22.

The credit had been eliminated in the House proposal drafted by Republicans several weeks ago, but was included in the Senate's version of the tax bill. That led to speculation in recent weeks about the fate of this important incentive for EV buyers and the potential impact on the EV industry. 

CALSTART, in a letter signed by many of its more than 180 member companies, lobbied to keep the credit, stating that it "protects U.S. job creation and leadership in the electric vehicle sector." See a
USA Today article for more details.

SHEIKH TO SUCCEED SADREDIN AS SJVAPCD APCO

Seyed Sadredin has announced he will retire in 2018 after leading the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District since 2006. His career in air quality has spanned more than three decades.

Samir Sheikh will succeed Sadredin as the District's Air Pollution Control Officer (APCO), effective July 7. A longtime Air District employee, Sheikh currently serves as Deputy APCO with leadership over the Strategies and Incentives Department and several other administrative areas of the organization.    

Looking for Grant Information?

The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District offers a variety of grants and incentive programs for public agencies, residents, businesses and technology. Interested parties should apply early since incentives typically are available on a first-come, first-served basis. A complete list of current incentive programs is available on the Air District website.

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) administers grant programs funded through various sources, including the cap-and-trade program. A complete list of the various funding programs is available on the
CARB website.

The California Energy Commission (CEC) also administers grant programs for transportation technology. Go to the 
CEC website for information.

Various federal agencies offer grants and incentives for transportation technology each year. All federal agencies use the
Grants.gov website for submitting and receiving grant applications. 
 


“The CALSTART San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center is a joint project between CALSTART and the California Energy Commission (CEC). It is funded through a grant from the CEC with the mission to assist residents and businesses in the San Joaquin Valley deploy cleaner transportation options to help improve air quality and promote economic prosperity.  For more information about CALSTART, visit www.calstart.org.”

Copyright © 2017 by CALSTART, All rights reserved.

Contact Us
Joseph Oldham, Director    Thomas Paddon, Regional Project Manager
San Joaquin Valley Clean Transportation Center
Fresno Address: 510 W. Kearney Blvd., Fresno, CA 93706
Fresno Phone: (559) 797-6034
Stockton Address: 5000 S. Airport Way, Suite #208, Stockton, CA 95206
Stockton Phone: (626) 744-5637
Email: joldham@calstart.org and tpaddon@calstart.org

Newsletter Editor: Brenda Turner, Project Clean Air
projectcleanairprograms@gmail.com

Statewide LG EE Best Practices: Weekly Update

Here are your last wEEkly updates for 2016 - and the last one from me specifically as we will be bringing on a new Best Practices Coordinator in 2017! We hope you enjoy your holiday break!


In this issue of Currents, we feature a broad range of articles that highlight local projects, celebrate success, and discuss emergent trends:

News and Opportunities

Bill Gates and Investors Worth $170B Launching a Fund for Energy Innovation
Bill Gates is leading a more than $1 billion fund focused on fighting climate change by investing in clean energy innovation. He was among 28 wealthy individuals and families signed on to the Breakthrough Energy Coalition, a group broadly committed to investing in this area.

CA Agency Recommends Low-Income Energy and Water Legislation and Task Force
On December 14th, the CEC approved the SB 350 Barriers Study mandated by SB 350 to address barriers for low-income households and disadvantaged communities to participate in energy efficiency and renewables opportunities. The California Housing Partnership will work with partners on legislative and regulatory efforts to use this study's findings to advance transformative equity goals and metrics, energy and water program alignment, the availability of one-stop technical services, and effective financing pilots designed for low-income rental housing in California.


Job Opportunities: Redwood Coast Energy Authority
Redwood Coast Energy Authority is recruiting for multiple positions including Director of Finance & HR, Director of Power Resources, and Demand Side Management Programs Project Manager.

Job Opportunity: Chief Executive Officer, The Valley Clean Energy Alliance
Yolo County is conducting a recruitment on behalf of The Valley Clean Energy Alliance for the Chief Executive Officer position. Applications due January 20, 2017.

Calendar
Click the Calendar link to view all upcoming events.

1/25-1/26 (Sacramento) California Climate Change Symposium 2017
This forum aims to share cutting-edge research addressing the impacts of climate change on the state to inform the state's strategies and policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to develop programs to safeguard California from a changing climate.

2/2/17 (St. Louis, MO) New Partners for Smart Growth Conference
Early-bird registration has been extended to December 16th  for the 2017 New Partners for Smart Growth Conference. This conference is the nation's largest smart growth and sustainability event and has been named one of 12 conferences not to miss by Planetizen.

3/16-3/19 (Yosemite National Park) Yosemite Policymakers Conference
Join mayors, city council members, county supervisors, city managers, and high-level department heads for the 26th Annual Yosemite Policymakers Conference. This popular conference always features a timely and inspirational program designed to provide the tools and support policymakers need to implement innovative solutions to address society's most pressing challenges. This year's conference will be no different with its focus on sustaining our progress and protecting the American dream.

Resources and Reports

DOE Better Buildings Financing Navigator
The Navigator is an online tool that helps public and private sector organizations find financing solutions for energy efficiency projects.

A Greater LA: A Framework for Climate Action
This project led by the Los Angeles Regional Collaborative for Climate Action and Sustainability was recently released and provides a set of curated, synthesized, and regionally specific recommendations across five climate impact areas: Energy, Transportation & Land Use, Water, Public Health, and Ocean & Coastal Resources.

The Case for Healthy Places: Improving Health Outcomes Through Placemaking
This report uses the idea of placemaking as a framework for describing how transforming public spaces can improve health outcomes. Even beyond the tangible benefits that placemaking projects can yield, the very process of bringing community members and stakeholders together to shape a place can have powerful social benefits that in turn connect to positive health outcomes.